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The Worshipful Company of Tylers and Bricklayers

www.tylersandbricklayers.co.uk


Annual Livery Dinner
May 2016, Carpenters' Hall, London

Tylers and Bricklayers Company - Annual Dinner at Carpenters' Hall, May 2016  Tylers and Bricklayers Company - Annual Dinner at Carpenters' Hall, May 2016

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600th Anniversary Concert
April 2016, Milton Court auditorium, City of London

www.tylersandbricklayers.co.uk/...600th-anniversary-concert
www.gsmd.ac.uk/...concert_hall

Tylers and Bricklayers Company - 600th Anniversary Concert, Apr 2016  Tylers and Bricklayers Company - 600th Anniversary Concert, Apr 2016

Tylers and Bricklayers Company - 600th Anniversary Concert, Apr 2016  Tylers and Bricklayers Company - 600th Anniversary Concert, Apr 2016

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The Worshipful Company of Tylers and Bricklayers.

The earliest reference to a Master of the Company was in 1416 though records show that there was a Guild or Misterie representing the crafts well before that date. The Company's first Charter dates from 1568 and a City Ordinance of 1570 defined the Company's area of control as being within a radius of 15 miles of the City.

The Company initially flourished with bricks and tiles being used in place of timber and thatch. The Great Fire of 1666 led to a Royal Proclamation requiring the use of these more fire resistant materials. The re-building programme was beyond the capacity of Company members, craftsmen flocked in from elsewhere and the monopoly was broken. Succeeding years saw a continuing diminution in the influence of the Company and its fortunes though they, nonetheless, retained ownership of a hall until the end of the 19th century and almshouses in Islington until the second half of the 20th century. Masters and Liverymen of the Company have ensured that it still plays its part in support of the City, its crafts and numerous charitable causes. The Company ranks 37th in the order of precedence among the City of London Livery Companies. Two of its Liverymen have served as Lord Mayor of London.

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Court & Livery Luncheon
March 2015, Trinity House, London

Tylers and Bricklayers Company -  Court & Livery Dinner, March 2015   Tylers and Bricklayers Company -  Court & Livery Dinner, March 2015

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Court & Livery Dinner
February 2015, Armourers' Hall, London

Tylers and Bricklayers Company -  Court & Livery Dinner, Feb 2015   Tylers and Bricklayers Company -  Court & Livery Dinner, Feb 2015

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Court & Livery Dinner
Sept 2014, Girdlers' Hall, London

Tylers and Bricklayers Company -  Court & Livery Dinner, Sept 2014   Tylers and Bricklayers Company -  Court & Livery Dinner, Sept 2014

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Triennial Awards Presentation Luncheon
July 2014, Carpenters' Hall, London

Tylers and Bricklayers Company - Triennial Awards Presentation Luncheon, July 2014

Tylers and Bricklayers Company - Triennial Awards Presentation Luncheon, July 2014  Tylers and Bricklayers Company - Triennial Awards Presentation Luncheon, July 2014  Tylers and Bricklayers Company - Triennial Awards Presentation Luncheon, July 2014

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A Brief History of The Worshipful Company of Tylers and Bricklayers

The earliest reference to the Company is in 1416 though records show that a Guild representing the crafts was in existence well before that time. The Company's Charter was granted in 1568. A City Ordinance of 1570 defined its area of control as being within a radius of 15 miles of the City.

The Company flourished initially with brick and tiles being used in place of timber and thatch. The Great Fire of 1666 led to a Royal Proclamation requiring their use. The rebuilding programme was beyond the capacity of Company members; craftsmen flocked in from elsewhere and the monopoly was broken. The succeeding years saw a continuing reduction in the influence and fortunes of the Company which nonetheless retained ownership of a hall until the end of the 19th century and almshouses in Islington into the second half of the 20th century. Masters and Liverymen of the Company have ensured that it still plays its part in support of the City, its crafts and numerous charitable causes.

The Company ranks 37th in the order of precedence among the City of London Livery Companies. Two of its liverymen have served as Lord Mayor of London.

Carpenters' Hall

The history of the Carpenters' Company goes back over 700 years, with the first written reference a mention of a Master Carpenter in the City of London's records of 1271. It received its first Royal Charter in 1477, and in 1515 was ranked 26 in order of precedence out of the 48 City Livery Companies then existing.

The first Carpenters' Hall was built in 1429 and the Carpenters' Company has been located on London Wall ever since. Afire in the mid-nineteenth century severely weakened the building and a second Hall was built during the 1870s, opening in 1880. The third Hall, which still stands today, was built following an air raid in 1941 when its predecessor was completely burnt out.

The re-building began in 1956 within the external walls of the old Hall which had survived and were deemed to be of architectural interest to the designs of Austen Hall. At least 18 different kinds of wood were used throughout the building, which was intended to act as a showcase for the craft of carpentry.

A bridge was built over Throgmorton Avenue to house part of the large banqueting hall, and additional windows were added on the second floor, modifying the external appearance of the Hall. The new banqueting hall was designed by Clifford Wearden of Sir Basil Spence's practice, in a modern, contemporary style. The Hall was opened in 1960.

The Tylers' and Bricklayers' Company is indebted to the Master and Wardens of the Carpenters' Company for their kind permission to use the Hall.

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Installation  Luncheon
Oct 2011, Carpenters' Hall, London

Tylers and Bricklayers Installation Luncheon Oct 2011

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Triennial Awards Presentation Luncheon
July 2011, Carpenters' Hall, London

Tylers and Bricklayers Company - Triennial Awards Presentation Luncheon, July 2011  Tylers and Bricklayers Company - Triennial Awards Presentation Luncheon, July 2011  Tylers and Bricklayers Company - Triennial Awards Presentation Luncheon, July 2011

Tylers and Bricklayers Company

The Worshipful Company
of
Tylers and Bricklayers

An Introduction to the Company

The Company welcomes expressions of interest in Membership from men and women who share its objectives:

* Upholding the traditions of the City of London

* Providing its members with opportunities, both formal and informal, for fellowship and entertaining guests

* Encouraging and rewarding excellence in the crafts of bricklaying, applied all and floor tiling and roof tiling and slating

* Supporting a range of craft-related and other charitable causes

A Brief History

The earliest reference to the Company is in 1416 though records show that a Guild representing the crafts was in existence well before that time. The Company’s Charter was granted in 1568. A City Ordinance of 1570 defined its area of control as being within a radius of 15 miles of the City.

The Company flourished initially with brick and tiles being used in place of timber and thatch. The Great Fire of 1666 led to a Royal Proclamation requiring their use. The rebuilding programme was beyond the capacity of Company members; craftsmen flocked in from elsewhere and the monopoly was broken. The succeeding years saw a continuing reduction in the influence and fortunes of the Company which nonetheless retained ownership of a hail until the end of the 19th century and almshouses in Islington into the second half of the 20th century. Masters and Liverymen of the Company have ensured that it still plays its part in support of the City, its crafts and numerous charitable causes.

The Company ranks 37th in the order of precedence among the City of London Livery Companies. Two of its liverymen have served as Lord Mayor of London.

Fellowship and Social Activities

A range of social and educational events are arranged which allow members, their wives and guests the opportunity of dining in some of the City’s finest Livery halls and of visit ing some of its greatest and historic institutions.

Membership

Members of the Company are drawn from a very wide range of backgrounds. Applications are welcomed not only from those with family, craft or professional links with the Company but also from anyone, working in the City or elsewhere, or retired, who wishes to support and uphold the objectives of the Company set out on the cover.

Support for the Crafts

The Company has always taken a special interest in those training for its crafts. It awards prizes for excellence achieved by students on courses at vocational colleges and in The Corps of Royal Engineers, the Company’s link regiment, and also for success in craft competitions such as Skillbuild. It is actively involved in a scheme leading to the revived qualification of Master Craftsman. Every three years the Company makes awards in each of its crafts to buildings or projects completed in that period.

Charitable Activities

Historically, the Livery Companies have supported a wide spectrum of charitable causes; the Company has established two trust funds to enable it to play its part in such work. All members are expected to contribute to the Charitable Trust and the Craft Trust which support , among other causes, children’s education and sponsorship of academic and craft prizes.

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